CWL RESOLUTIONS 2015

Following are the resolutions from the National Convention held in Vancouver in 2015 with the suggested actions plans. Please read and do what you can to implement some of the action plans in your daily life.

Resolutions from National Convention 2015
2015.01 Increased Early Intervention and Access to Children and Youth Mental Health Services
Whereas, An estimated 1.2 to 2 million children and youth in Canada suffer from mental illness, yet less than 20% receive access to appropriate supports, treatment or care due to long wait periods; and
Whereas, This lack of services may contribute to suicide, the leading cause of non-accidental death among youth, which could be decreased through early intervention; and
Whereas, Child and youth mental health is an area of shared federal and provincial/territorial jurisdiction; therefore, be it
Resolved, That national council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada, in 95th annual national convention assembled, urge the federal government, in collaboration with provincial/territorial governments, to provide increased early intervention and access to children and youth mental-health programs; and be it further
Resolved, That this resolution be forwarded through the national executive to the other ten provincial councils, encouraging them to become aware of this issue as it pertains to their province/territory, and to act on it, as deemed necessary/prudent.
Action Plan:
1. Write letters to the prime minister, minister of health and local members of parliament, urging the federal government to invest in pan-Canadian efforts to provide early intervention and access to youth suicide prevention initiatives and programs.
2. Write letters to provincial and territorial governments urging them to increase access to appropriate supports, treatment and care for youth mental health services in their province/territory.
3. Provide information and resources to members and the public regarding the need for youth mental health services, including early intervention and youth suicide prevention initiatives and programs.

2015.02 Ban Plastic Microbeads in Personal Care Products
Whereas, Plastic non-biodegradable microbeads in personal care products have been identified as a source of pollution in waterways; and
Whereas, The House of Commons voted to take measures to add microbeads to the List of Toxic Substances in Schedule 1 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999; therefore, be it
Resolved, That national council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada, in 95th annual national convention assembled, urge the federal government to ban plastic microbeads in personal care products; and be it further
Resolved, That this resolution be forwarded through the national executive to the other ten provincial councils, encouraging them to become aware of this issue as it pertains to their province/territory, and to act on it, as deemed necessary/prudent.
Action Plan
1. Write letters to federal/provincial/territorial ministers of health and environment, urging protection of Canada’s waterways through legislation banning plastic microbeads from personal care products
2. Write letters to the manufacturers of personal care products containing microbeads, urging them to switch to biodegradable alternatives.
3. Become knowledgeable about the effects of plastic microbeads on the environment.
4. Avoid purchasing products containing microbeads by checking their list of [avoid polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene terephlatate (PET) or polymethacrylate (PMMA)].
5. Invite a speaker dealing with health and/or environmental issues concerning plastic microbeads.

2015.03 Banning the Use of Neonicotinoid Pesticides
Whereas, Neonicotinoid pesticides are increasingly found in the ecosystem, posing a risk to pollinators, birds and invertebrates; and
Whereas, Neonicotinoid pesticides, widely used in Canadian agriculture and horticulture, are a class of neuro-active, nicotine-based insecticides; therefore, be it
Resolved, That national council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada, in 95th annual national convention assembled, urge the federal government to ban the use of neonicotinoid pesticides; and be it further
Resolved, That this resolution be forwarded through the national executive to the other ten provincial councils, encouraging them to become aware of this issue as it pertains to their province/territory, and to act on it, as deemed necessary/prudent.
Action Plan
1. Write letters to your local members of parliament requesting a ban on the widespread use of neonicotinoid pesticides.
2. Avoid buying neonicotinoid treated seeds, seedlings, or products that contain neonicotinoids. Purchase organic plant seedlings or grow plants from untreated seeds in organic potting soil for home gardens.
3. Advise local nursery managers/greenhouses you will only purchase plants free of neonicotinoids and ask managers to communicate your request to their suppliers.
4. Avoid the use of systemic bee-toxic pesticides in your garden. These products may contain acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, thiacloprid and dinotefuran as active ingredients.
5. If you have these products at home, dispose of them as municipal hazardous waste or take them back to the store where you bought them.
6. Provide habitat for pollinators by planting untreated pollinator-friendly trees and flowers.
2015.04 Invoke Section 33 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the case of Carter v. Canada
Whereas, Section 33 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, commonly known as the notwithstanding clause, may be invoked in response to the Supreme Court of Canada’s ruling on February 6, 2015 that struck down the Criminal Code of Canada prohibitions on assisted suicide in the case of Carter v. Canada; and
Whereas, The purpose of the notwithstanding clause is to give elected government the legislative authority to overturn or suspend a judicial court ruling in matters of public policy; and
Whereas, Legalized physician-assisted suicide has broad implications for all Canadian citizens, especially for the vulnerable in society facing end-of-life decisions and the medical professionals who are called to care for them, and thus requires more time than allowed for by the Supreme Court ruling so that consultation and dialogue can occur; therefore, be it
Resolved, That national council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada, in 95th annual national convention assembled, urge the federal government to invoke Section 33 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, keeping the present law against physician-assisted suicide in force, notwithstanding the ruling of the Supreme Court of Canada in the case of Carter v. Canada.
Action Plan
1. Write to the prime minister, minister of justice, minister of health and local members of parliament urging the federal government to invoke the notwithstanding clause, in response to the Supreme Court of Canada in the case ofCarter v.Canada
2. Educate members on end-of life issues and ethical responses
3. Monitor governments’ response to the request contained in this resolution

2015.05 Reinstatement of the Mandatory Long-Form Census
Whereas, In 2010, the federal government replaced the mandatory long-form census
with a voluntary National Household Survey; and
Whereas, The response rate between the mandatory long-form census and the voluntary National Household Survey dropped 24.2%, weakening the quality and availability of data in the areas of employment, housing, education, immigration and income; and
Whereas, Businesses, governments, educational institutions, health services, non-profits and charities use geographic statistics for allocating money and resources; therefore, be it
Resolved, That national council of The Catholic Women’s League of Canada, in 95th annual national convention assembled, urge the federal government to amend the Statistics Act to reinstate the mandatory long-form census.
Action Plan
1. Write to the prime minister, the minister of finance and local members of parliament, urging the federal government to reinstate the mandatory long-form census.
2. Educate members on the role of the mandatory long-form census in collecting reliable data to inform decision-making.
3. Generate questions for members to bring forward to candidates in the federal election, asking their position on reinstating of the long-form census.
4. Monitor the government’s response to the request contained in this resolution.